Balfour Beatty’s Construction Boost For Lakes College

A Generous donation from a major infrastructure employer has turned would-be waste into a boost for the construction workforce of the future.

Balfour Beatty has donated equipment which would otherwise have gone to waste to the construction department at Lakes College, where it will benefit the next generation of electrical students and apprentices.

With one of its projects wrapping up, the company has given tools, test equipment and electrical containment, such as conduits, trunking and traywork, which will support apprentices and students to develop their inspection, testing and hand skills.

John Barron, lecturer in electrical installation at Lakes College, said: “This generous donation from Balfour Beatty has provided us with installation cables which would otherwise have been a huge expense for the college.

“This saving allows us to invest more in other areas to support the quality of the teaching and delivery of our courses to electrical apprentices.

“This isn’t the first time that the company has donated to the college and local industry.

“I would like to thank John Rix, Russell Frears and their supporting colleagues for delivering these much-needed electrical installation supplies.”

The equipment will be put to use in the college’s multi-million-pound Construction Skills Centre.

The donation is not the first time Balfour Beatty has reached out a helping hand to potential future employees on campus.

Russell Frears, electrician for Balfour Beatty at Sellafield Ltd, said: “The project we’ve been working on is coming to an end so we are demobilising and we’ve brought through a lot of equipment and some old tools that we no longer require which will be beneficial for the college.

“John Barron was actually my instructor when I was an apprentice so I’ve kept in touch with him and they have had equipment off us in the past like spare cables.

“As a leading infrastructure group, Balfour Beatty and BBK are proud to support local communities and especially students and young people looking to pursue a career in mechanical and electrical engineering.

“If we can divert materials from landfill to a use much more positively in training employees of the future, then it benefits the college, our company and ultimately is good for the planet.”

To find out more about studying construction at Lakes College, visit www.lcwc.ac.uk.